Prison Art

Prison Arts

Donate The Arts Alliance of Northern New Hampshire is pleased to announce that we will be acting as fiscal agent and partner with the Episcopal Church of New Hampshire, offering arts classes in correctional facilities around the state.

This plan has grown out of two series of art classes at the Northern New Hampshire Correctional Facility in Berlin, led by Berlin artist Andre Belanger. Inmates have participated in woodprinting, charcoal and pastel classes.

Art classes begin in the NH State Prison for Men in Concord, the NH State Prison for Women in Goffstown, and the Federal Correctional Institution in Berlin this summer.

Our goal is to offer classes in various art mediums, and, when possible, to provide other programs including performances and workshops.

The Prison Art Program is founded in the belief that arts experiences can expand the outlook of inmates, and encourage inner growth through self discovery and self expression.

We appreciate your tax-deductible donations to support this program. Funds will be applied directly to artist fees. Your contribution is a gift to open up a person's life to new possibilities of expression and of reflection.

Our thanks for the inspiring leadership of Rosalie Richards and her advisors, who notes, “As Andre Belanger says, 'through these art classes we not only draw pictures, we draw hope.' “ Questions? Call us at 323-7302 or email us



I am standing with four of the 16 people who are registered for art class. We are studying the elements of composition in still life rendering. This is about the men in class, and the enrichment they gain by doing something out of the norm when living outside mainstream culture. It is about talents put to use, not hidden or buried behind closed doors.

Arts Alliance of Northern New Hampshire

  PO Box 892
Littleton, NH 03561
603-323-7302
info@aannh.org 

The class was wonderful. Already, I can see the joy in the eyes of the men as they are lifted away from their everyday routine. Some of the men are brand new at this drawing stuff, some men are old veterans to the craft The wonder was palpable, the interconnected support was obvious -- through nodding heads and somewhat strained smiles, to outright accolades and handshakes and fist bumps throughout the session. The playing field was leveled. All the images from the first day were powerfully rendered, and were examples of dedication to learn. Every man was grateful, as am I.